ROCK ART
ACROSS THE BURRUP PENINSULA

Rock Art- Deep Gorge

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Travel Time: 26 min
Distance: 28 km

Deep Gorge, situated on the Burrup Peninsula, is a wonderful natural record of Aboriginal culture. This area is recognised as one of the most prolific Aboriginal rock art sites in Australia. Over 10,000 individual rock engravings (petroglyphs) and etchings have been located in this archaeologically rich region. The collection of rock engravings number over one million across the Dampier Archipelago and Burrup Peninsula, many depicting images of the now extinct Thylacine (Tasmanian Tiger). Prepare to be taken back in time as you leave the main road, along a 100 metre track to the car park and walk along the dry creek of this amazing gorge.

As you venture down the creek at Deep Gorge, surrounded by huge granite boulders and Currajong trees, marvel at the petroglyphs etched into the rocks, and gain an appreciation of the Jaburara Tribe’s self sufficient lifestyle. Shell middens provide evidence of their seafood diets; the granite boulders would have offered shelter from the harsh weather conditions; and the creek, now mostly dry, would have been their only water supply.

After discovering ancient Aboriginal culture at Deep Gorge, why not visit Hearson’s Cove, one of WA’s most beautiful beaches (only 100m past the turnoff to Deep Gorge).

Rock Art Tours

Take a guided tour with Clinton from Ngurrangga Tours as you travel through the Murujuga National Park.  With the highest concentration of rock art in the world, rediscover the petroglyphs (rock art) created by the Yaburrara (Northern Ngarluma) people. The rock art has been dated back to before the ice age ended and is approx. over 40,000 years old and there is up to 1 million rock art images scattered across the entire Burrup Peninsula and Dampier Archipelago.

Contact Ngurrangga Tours - 42 Roe Street Roebourne WA 6718 Australia or telephone them on +61 (08) 9182 1777.

Email: bookings@ngurrangga.com.au